ABA SEER Native American Resources Committee Law Student Writing Competition

Here are details. The highlights re: the writing competition are as follows:


Papers are due May 31, 2023, and must not exceed 20 pages (double-spaced)
Papers can relate to any legal/policy question re: “environmental, energy, or resources legal issues related to Native Americans, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, other Indigenous peoples, Indigenous peoples generally, and/or the field of Indian and tribal law.”
The first-place winner will receive a $1,000 cash prize.

OU Law Will Host National Native American Law Competition

NORMAN, OKLA. The University of Oklahoma College of Law will host the 31st annual National Native American Law Students Association (NNALSA) moot court competition on February 25 – 26, 2023 at the OU Law Center.
NNALSA selected OU Law’s bid in July 2022. Professors M. Alexander Pearl and Taiawagi Helton are co-authoring this year’s moot court problem, in which the teams will brief and argue.
“In partnership with Native Nations from in-state and around the country, we have long led the way in integrating Indigenous Peoples’ Law across doctrinal and experiential aspects of our program,” notes college dean Katheleen Guzman. “Given that this year marks the 200th anniversary of a foundational case for federal Indian law and policy [Johnson v. M’Intosh], as well as the 50th anniversary of our own American Indian Law Review – the first of its kind in the nation – we are especially honored that NNALSA selected OU Law to host this year, and proud of the work that our NALSA Chapter members engaged to secure this singular opportunity and will expend on running a first-rate event.”
Recognized as the premier federal Indian law moot court competition in the nation, the OU Law NALSA chapter will coordinate this year’s competition comprised of 34 teams from law schools around the country. Team registration will be on a first-come, first-served basis with a limitation of 2 teams per school.
Respectively, the University of North Dakota hosted the 29th annual competition and the University of Colorado hosted the 30th annual competition. OU Law is excited to return to an inperson format for the 31st annual competition.
“We are proud to have been chosen this year and we are excited to be able to showcase the College that hosts our incredible Indian law curriculum and the faculty that teaches our Native students. We look forward to personally meeting everyone in February,” comments OU NALSA President Reagan McGuire.
The competition website will go live in October. Stay tuned for more information.

36th Annual Coming Together of Peoples Conference, University of Wisconsin Law School March 3rd through the 5th

The 36th Annual Coming Together of Peoples Conference is taking place March 3rd through March 5th. This conference is the longest-running Federal Indian Law conference in the country. The areas of Federal Indian law that this year’s conference encompass a multitude of subjects, cases, and experts, such as: the success of tribes at the United States Supreme Court; the newly amended Oneida gaming compact and its impact on the future of Wisconsin gaming; the current state of ICWA; an Ethics panel, and more. Aurene Martin (UW ‘93), Managing Partner and Founding Member of Spirit Rock Consulting will deliver the keynote address.

The conference has been approved for 11 (1.5EPR) CLE credits in the state of Wisconsin, CLE credits are pending for the state of Minnesota. Please register using this link https://www.eventbrite.com/e/36th-annual-coming-together-of-peoples-conference-tickets-240455598167