Res Ipsa Loquitur Issues 1 and 2 [History of U.Mich. Student Ad Hoc Committee on Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation, 1996]

In 1996, Michigan law students formed an Ad Hoc Committee on Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation after the office door of Lance Jones, an African-American faculty member, was defaced with a racist slur. Shortly after that, the Res Gestae, a law student publication, published an attack on Catharine MacKinnon. The Ad Hoc Committee’s formation was followed by the publication of Res Ipsa Loquitur, a newsletter on race, gender, and sexual orientation. We’re making two issues of that newsletter available here.

Here:

Res Ipsa Loquitur Issue 1

Res Ipsa Loquitur Issue 2

Here is a twitter thread that is aggregating the issues and responses to Dean West’s initial statement and the responses from students and others (June 4-June 6)(includes documents).

New Student Scholarship on Jurisdiction and Gender-Based Violence against Native Women

Emily Mendoza has published “Jurisdictional Transparency and Native American Women” in the California Law Review Online.

Here is the abstract:

While lawmakers have long known that Native American women experience gender-based violence at higher rates than any other population, lawmakers historically have addressed these harms by implementing jurisdictional changes: removing tribal jurisdiction entirely, limiting tribal jurisdiction, or returning jurisdiction to tribes in a piecemeal fashion. The result is a “jurisdictional maze” that law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and courts are unable to successfully administer to bring perpetrators to justice. This Article is the first to identify what I call “jurisdictional transparency”—or clear, easily ascertainable rules governing courts’ jurisdiction—as a core value of the American legal system and will argue that a lack of jurisdictional transparency over criminal prosecutions in Indian country contributes to the excessive rates of domestic violence, sexual assault, and rape against Native American women. Because arguments for or against sovereignty are divisive and often put a swift end to productive dialogue, this has often led to the layering of more jurisdictional rules on top of the current system. Jurisdictional transparency, on the other hand, advocates an approach that is both more fundamental and more attainable: allocating criminal jurisdiction in Indian country in a way that can be easily determined at the outset of a case.

The Article begins by examining jurisdictional rules in other contexts while highlighting the federal courts’ continuous demand for clear jurisdictional rules in the interest of judicial efficiency and public access to the courts. With this backdrop, the Article then illuminates the discrepancy between such transparency demands and the opaque jurisdictional rules in Indian Country, using key case examples to demonstrate the system’s failures. Finally, the Article proposes a solution that is reflected in numerous facets of the law: jurisdictional transparency. Such a solution has a procedural guise capable of penetrating a polarized political climate while lifting the opacity that has prevented thousands of Native American women from accessing justice.

Lawsuit Regarding the Right to Wear a Traditionally-Beaded Graduation Cap and Eagle Plume at High School Graduation

Here is the Complaint in Larissa Waln and Bryan Waln v. Dysart School District et al. in the District of Arizona.

More information and the press release can be seen here.

American Indian Law Review, Volume 44, Issue 1

Here:

Front Pages   PDF

Article

How the New Deal Became a Raw Deal for Indian Nations: Justice Stanley Reed and the Tee-Hit-Ton Decision on Indian Title – Kent McNeil   PDF

Comments

Keeping Cultural Bias Out of the Courtroom: How ICWA “Qualified Expert Witnesses” Make a Difference – Elizabeth Low   PDF

Being Uighur . . . with “Chinese Characteristics”: Analyzing China’s Legal Crusade Against Uighur Identity – Brennan Davis   PDF

Notes

United States v. Bryant: The Results of Upholding Women’s Rights and Tribal Sovereignty – Madalynn Martin   PDF

What Are the Odds? The Potential for Tribal Control of Sports Gambling After Murphy v. NCAA – Haley Maynard   PDF

Special Feature

Thickening the Thin Blue Line in Indian Country: Affirming Tribal Authority to Arrest Non-Indians – Alex Treiger   PDF

Indigenous Peoples’ Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance Call for Papers

The Indigenous Peoples’ Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance
(IPJLCR) is accepting submissions for Volume 7, slated to be published in
Winter 2021. Submissions are being accepted until March 1st, 2020.
IPJLCR is a law journal at the University of California Los Angeles
School of Law that is interdisciplinary in nature, consisting of scholarly
articles, legal commentary, poetry, songs, stories, and artwork. We are
soliciting scholarly articles and student comments written about legal issues
important to Indigenous communities in the United States and throughout
the world, as well as works by artists that relate to or comment on legal
issues. We also seek works on issues or aspects of life in Native
communities that are impacted by law, whether tribal law or the laws of
nation-states.

IPJLCR is committed to Native issues, federal Indian law, and tribal
law. Past issues include: writings by Matthew L. M. Fletcher, Naomi Lanoi
Leleto, Robert J. Miller, Robert Alan Hershey, and Geneva E. B. Thompson,
an essay by Joy Harjo on resistance, poetry by Sara Littlecrow-Russel,
Mahealani Kamauu, Lydia Locklear, Tekpatl Tonalyohlotl Kuauhtzin, and
Shawna Shandiin Sunrise, and artwork by Elizabeth Whipple and Nadema
Agard Winyan Luta Red Woman, as well as photography by Anna
Tsouhlarakis, Cathy Hewitt and Rob Wilson, .

Email Submissions to: ipjlcr@lawnet.ucla.edu

Requirements: Each submission should be sent as one Microsoft Word file with
Bluebook formatted citations (20th ed. 2015). Brief bios are required, as well as 12 pt.
Times New Roman typed font, paginated, and should include: your name, address, phone
number, and email address in the header of the first page.

Call for Submissions Winter 2021

American Indian Law Review, Volume 43, Issue 2

Here:

Current Issue: Volume 43, Number 2 (2019)

Article

Comment

Notes

Special Feature

American Indian Law Journal: Call for Submissions to Spring 2020 Issue

AILJ

The American Indian Law Journal, published by the Seattle University School of Law, serves as a vital online resource providing high quality articles on issues relevant to Indian law practitioners and scholars across the country. The American Indian Law Journal accepts articles and abstracts on Indian Law for consideration from students, practitioners, tribal members, and law school faculty members.

The American Indian Law Journal is currently
accepting submissions for potential publication
in the spring 2020 issue.

Submission Deadline:

Spring issue January 5, 2020

Article submissions are accepted through Scholastica, BePress, and AILJ@seattleu.edu. The editing process for publication begins soon after these deadlines for each respective issue. The American Indian Law Journal respectfully requests that authors please use footnotes rather than endnotes. All footnotes must conform to the 20th edition of The Bluebook.

For more information or to submit an article, please contact Phoebe Millsap, Content Editor, millsapp@seattleu.edu.