36th Annual Coming Together of Peoples Conference, University of Wisconsin Law School March 3rd through the 5th

The 36th Annual Coming Together of Peoples Conference is taking place March 3rd through March 5th. This conference is the longest-running Federal Indian Law conference in the country. The areas of Federal Indian law that this year’s conference encompass a multitude of subjects, cases, and experts, such as: the success of tribes at the United States Supreme Court; the newly amended Oneida gaming compact and its impact on the future of Wisconsin gaming; the current state of ICWA; an Ethics panel, and more. Aurene Martin (UW ‘93), Managing Partner and Founding Member of Spirit Rock Consulting will deliver the keynote address.

The conference has been approved for 11 (1.5EPR) CLE credits in the state of Wisconsin, CLE credits are pending for the state of Minnesota. Please register using this link https://www.eventbrite.com/e/36th-annual-coming-together-of-peoples-conference-tickets-240455598167

American Indian Law Journal — Vol. 9, Issue 1

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Current Issue: Volume 9, Issue 1 (2020)

Articles

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ANOTHER INAPPROPRIATE F WORD: FIDUCIARY DOCTRINE AND THE CROWN-INDIGENOUS RELATIONSHIP IN CANADA
Bryan Birtles

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“ONE PERSON, ONE VOTE”: NAVAJO NATION V. SAN JUAN COUNTY AND VOTER SUPPRESSION OF NATIVE AMERICANS
Carter Fox

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MORTGAGE LENDING ON TRIBAL LANDS: FEDERAL FAIR LENDING PROTECTIONS, PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS, AND TRIBAL SOLUTIONS FOR INCREASING ACCESS TO MORTGAGE CREDIT ON TRIBAL LANDS
Abby Hogan

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REHABILITATIVE JUSTICE: THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HEALING TO WELLNESS, OPIOID INTERVENTION, AND DRUG COURTS
Majidah M. Cochran and Christine L. Kettel

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THE INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT’S APPLICATION TO CIVIL COMMITMENTS OF INDIAN CHILDREN IN STATE COURT PROCEEDING
Courtney Lewis

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PEYOTE CRISIS CONFRONTING MODERN INDIGENOUS PEOPLES: THE DECLINING PEYOTE POPULATION AND A DEMAND FOR CONSERVATION
James D. Muneta

Administrative Law Review Podcast on the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe’s Federal Recognition Struggle

Here.

On today’s episode of A Hard Look, a Junior Staffer on ALR, Olivia Miller, joins host, Sarah Knarzer, and Professor Matthew Fletcher to discuss the tribal recognition process and the barriers it poses to tribes across the United States, and in particular the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe. Earlier this year, and in the middle of a surging coronavirus pandemic, the Bureau of Indian Affairs announced its intention to revoke the Mashpee Wampanoag’s land from its federal trust. This action is only a continuation of the Mashpee Wampanoag’s four hundred year struggle for tribal survival, dating back to the origins of the Thanksgiving myth.

Olivia and Professor Fletcher discuss Olivia’s comment, which she wrote as part of ALR’s comment writing process, to identify why the tribal recognition process is such a difficult, expensive, and frustrating administrative process for tribes who want and need to be federally recognized.