American Indian Law Journal: Call for Submissions to Spring 2020 Issue

AILJ

The American Indian Law Journal, published by the Seattle University School of Law, serves as a vital online resource providing high quality articles on issues relevant to Indian law practitioners and scholars across the country. The American Indian Law Journal accepts articles and abstracts on Indian Law for consideration from students, practitioners, tribal members, and law school faculty members.

The American Indian Law Journal is currently
accepting submissions for potential publication
in the spring 2020 issue.

Submission Deadline:

Spring issue January 5, 2020

Article submissions are accepted through Scholastica, BePress, and AILJ@seattleu.edu. The editing process for publication begins soon after these deadlines for each respective issue. The American Indian Law Journal respectfully requests that authors please use footnotes rather than endnotes. All footnotes must conform to the 20th edition of The Bluebook.

For more information or to submit an article, please contact Phoebe Millsap, Content Editor, millsapp@seattleu.edu.

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform Symposium — Panel on History of Property Dispossession

Moderator, Bernadette Atuahene, Beryl Satter, Louise Seamster, Michael Witgen, Mary Kathlene Sickel (symposium editor)

Maurisa Bell, NNALSA 3L of the Year

 

Bell
National NALSA 3L of the Year Award recipient, Maurisa Bell (right).

Maurisa Bell grew up on the Wind River Reservation in Riverton, Wyoming. She is an enrolled member of the Eastern Shoshone Tribe and was also raised around her Northern Arapaho family. In 2015, she graduated from Montana State University in Bozeman, MT and completed the Pre-Law Summer Institute program during the summer of 2016. While in law school, Maurisa served as Vice President and Treasurer for the MSU-NALSA, an Area representative for National-NALSA, and volunteered as a student mentor for the Indigenous Law and Policy Center.

She spent her summers in Washington, D.C. working for the Department of Justice’s Office of Tribal Justice; the National Indian Gaming Commission; and Dentons, US LLP in their Native American Law and Policy practice group. She is a dedicated and driven leader who, in just a few weeks, will graduate from the Michigan State University College of Law.

Maurisa will work for Dentons upon graduation, pursuing her passion in helping tribes and tribal communities.

Congratulations, Maurisa!

New Student Scholarship on Indian Country Abortion Access

Heidi L. Guzmán has published “Roe on the Rez: The Case for Expanding Abortion Access on Tribal Land” in the Columbia Journal of Race and Law.

Here is the abstract:

While the courts have codified and reaffirmed the right to abortion, some state legislatures have enacted increasingly burdensome restrictions on abortion. In a number of states, there is only one abortion clinic available for thousands of people. This Note explores whether Native American tribes, as sovereigns, may establish holistic reproductive health clinics on tribal land. It analyzes abortion law in Wisconsin under the framework of Public Law 280 jurisprudence to determine that clinics in Indian Country would not be subject to state abortion regulations. This Note also explores the practical implications of a Native-owned-and-operated clinic, and concludes that these clinics would greatly increase access to safe reproductive health care for Native and non-Native people.

New Issue from UCLA’s Indigenous Peoples’ Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance

Here:

Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Articles

Introduction: Global Dimensions of Indigenous Self-Determination
Maasai Resistance to Cultural Appropriation in Tourism
The Doctrine of Discovery: The International Law of Colonialism
‘Paradigm Wars’ Revisited: New Eyes on Indigenous Peoples’ Resistance to Globalization

New Issue of American Indian Law Review

Here:

Current Issue: Volume 43, Number 1 (2018)

Articles

Comments

Notes

Special Feature