NAICJA Webiner – McGirt v. Oklahoma Supreme Court Oral Arguments: An analysis of the History, Law, and Arguments of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation Reservation Case

McGirt Flier v2

Date & Time: Wednesday, June 3, 2020 from 12:30 pm-2:00 PM MST (90) minutes.

Webinar Narrative: The United States Supreme Court heard oral arguments on May 11, 2020 in McGirt v. Oklahoma, case #18-9526 (by telephone) involving the status of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation reservation. Last year, the Court heard arguments on a nearly identical case in the Murphy matter. This decision could have enormous impact for Indian law, positive or negative. Come join us for a FREE webinar to hear tribal perspective as to the surrounding Muscogee cultural history, the jurisprudence of Indian lands in Oklahoma and thoughts and analysis of the oral arguments from the Muscogee Nation’s Supreme Court amicus brief advocate Riyaz Kanji.

Register Here: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_7CZVYSf8QMSxDtxHftI-Tg

 

New Book: “The Cherokee Supreme Court 1823–1835”

From Carolina Academic Press, here (h/t Legal History Blog):

The Cherokee Supreme Court

1823–1835

by J. Matthew Martin

Forthcoming April 2020 • paper

ISBN 978-1-5310-1841-2
e-ISBN 978-1-5310-1842-9

Tags: Indian and Indigenous Peoples LawLegal HistoryRegional Interest


The first legal history of the first tribal court upends long-held misconceptions about the origins of Westernized tribal jurisprudence. This book demonstrates how the Cherokee people—prior to their removal on the Trail of Tears—used their judicial system as an external exemplar of American legal values, while simultaneously deploying it as a bulwark for tribal culture and tradition in the face of massive societal pressure and change. Extensive case studies document the Cherokee Nation’s exercise of both criminal and civil jurisdiction over American citizens, the roles of women and language in the Supreme Court, and how the courts were used to regulate the slave trade among the Cherokees. Although long-known for its historical value, the legal significance of the Cherokee Supreme Court has not been explored until now

National Archives Office in Seattle to Close [updated with Senators’ letter]

From the Seattle Times, here is “‘Terrible and disgusting’: Decision to close National Archives at Seattle a blow to tribes, historians in 4 states.”

Update:

2020_0124_National-Archives-Senators-Letter

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform Symposium — Panel on History of Property Dispossession

Moderator, Bernadette Atuahene, Beryl Satter, Louise Seamster, Michael Witgen, Mary Kathlene Sickel (symposium editor)

Michigan Journal of Law Reform 2019-2020 Symposium — “Dispossessing Detroit: How the Law Takes Property”

Here:

Law Reform Symposium

WHEN: Saturday, November 9, 8 AM – 5 PM 

WHERE: Hutchins Hall (various locations) 

WHAT: The goals of this Symposium are to provide historical and political context for current issues of property dispossession and to consider how governments, private industry, and private citizens can together seek reform. We are excited to bring together voices from law, policy, city government, community organizations, and more to engage the audience on this critical topic! Whether your interests are in tax foreclosure, bankruptcy, or Detroit’s story of dispossession, we hope you will join us. 

RSVP: https://dispossessingdetroitsymposium.com/rsvp-comment/ 

Continue reading

News Profile of Lyda Conley, 1st Native Woman to Argue before SCOTUS

Here is “Lyda Conley and the battle for Wyandot recognition.”

“Thank you, TurtleTalk, for this story.  Lyda Conley is an inspiration to all of us who practice in the field.  Oftentimes, I have been identified as the first native woman to argue in the Supreme Court, wrongly so as it turns out.  For one, I’m proud to stand behind Lyda in second, third, or whatever place it puts me.  Let the record stand corrected.”  Arlinda Locklear

We at Turtle Talk have always thought of Arlinda as the first in the modern era. 🙂