National Native American Bar Association Declares Takomni Hasapa Wiconi Hecha (Black Lives Matter)

Here.

An excerpt:

Study after study confirms what we already know to be true, and in some cases, have experienced ourselves – the bias against black and brown people in the criminal justice system corrupts nearly every encounter. From the treatment of victims, handling of suspects, stops for “suspicious activity,” to any other type of encounter, racial biases are present. The constitutional and civil rights of black and brown people are violated on a daily basis. Law enforcement kill black and brown people at alarming rates. According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, law enforcement killed Native Americans at the highest rate from 1999 to 2015, just above the rate for Black Americans. In the Ninth Circuit alone, Native Americans have 18 times as many fatal encounters per population as whites. Historic trauma and mental illness are pervasive factors in Native encounters with police, particularly those that result in death. The criminal justice system is out of balance and unjust, and the wounds run very deep

Courtney Liss: “Want to change the law? Change law school.”

Here.

An excerpt:

At my school, it took dozens of students elevating each other’s voices and alumni’s threat to withhold thousands of dollars in donations before the school considered breaking the precedent. It took each of us sharing heartbreaking personal narratives, demanding the public and the administration look into our wounds directly for administrators to be great lawyers who could understand the purpose of the old precedent (to help foster a diverse and inclusive educational environment) and create new methods of achieving that purpose, including saying publicly that Black Lives Matter and sharing the Black Law Student Association’s demands with students and alumni to drive accountability.