Webinar: Working in Tribal Communities to Protect Victims and Communities from Firearms in DV Cases

May 22, 2017 – 11:00am PT, 12:00pm MT, 1:00pm CT, 2:00pm ET

Tribal communities face a variety of unique obstacles to removing firearms from individuals who are prohibited from having them due to civil protection orders (CPOs) or criminal convictions for domestic violence.  Yet the CPO and criminal processes provide many opportunities for professionals to learn about and respond effectively to abusers’ access to firearms using existing laws.  The NCJFCJ and our partners have gathered examples of strategies from around the country to help Tribal and other communities take full advantage of these intervention opportunities so that they can better protect victims and others from firearms violence. 
NCJFCJ, in partnership with the Office on Violence Against Women, is leading a Firearms Pilot Site Initiative (FPSI) that will provide training and technical assistance on these strategies and practices.  The project is a collaboration with the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) and other national TA providers (AEquitas, BWJP, CCI, the IACP, and Ujima), as well as expert practitioners from around the country. The FPSI will work with selected sites to assist them in developing interdisciplinary efforts to improve local implementation of firearms prohibitions in civil and criminal domestic violence contexts.
This webinar will discuss challenges and strategies pertinent to Tribal communities that are involved in efforts to effectively implement firearms restrictions in domestic violence cases.  It will also introduce professionals and communities to the FPSI, which soon will be selecting sites for in-depth technical assistance, training, and other support.  The NCJFCJ and its partners will assist selected sites in assessing their implementation efforts and challenges, identifying gaps, and developing partnerships among community stakeholders, including federal partners, to design and implement practices that will enhance victim and community safety.  

Presented by:
Carolina LaPorte, Senior Native Affairs Advisor, National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center
Nancy Hart, JD, Senior Program Attorney, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges
Darren Mitchell, JD, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Consultant

 

Link to register for webinar: here

Closed Captioning will be provided. The webinar will be 60 minutes long and will be recorded and made available to individuals who cannot participate in the live webinar. If you have further questions regarding this event, please contact Alicia Lord at alord@ncjfcj.org.

NAICJA 2017 Conference RFP

The National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA) invites presentation proposals for the 48th Annual National Tribal Judicial and Court Personnel Conference which will be held October 10-13, 2017, at the beautiful Isleta Resort & Casino in Albuquerque, NM. NAICJA’s Annual Conference offers innovative and timely tribal justice information through high quality presentations by national experts.

The theme of this year’s conference is, “Tribal Justice: Building and Strengthening Relationships and Partnerships.” NAICJA is featuring topics that highlight ways in which American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and First Nations justice systems are building and strengthening relationships between tribes, states, federal agencies, and organizations including the philanthropic sector. We are especially interested in presentations that focus on collaboration and partnerships, tribal sovereignty, international frameworks for understanding indigenous principles and topics, promising Indian child welfare practices, court security, and other areas of interest to court clerks and court personnel.

Full details available here:  NAICJA 2017 Presentation RFP Final.

 

 

This is your opportunity to share your expertise and display your creativity by developing an original program for presentation. Proposals specifically tailored to meet the needs of the 300-person NAICJA audience are strongly preferred. Proposals are due on or before Monday, May 1, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. (MST).

Webinar: Protecting Victims and Communities from Firearms in Domestic Violence Cases

Protecting Victims and Communities from Firearms in Domestic Violence Cases: Collaborative Strategies

April 26, 2017 – 11:00am PT, 12:00pm MT, 1:00pm CT, 2:00pm ET

Is your community doing all it can to prevent firearms-related violence perpetrated by abusers in DV cases? Are you encountering challenges to implementing existing state, tribal, & federal firearms restrictions? Learn about strategies for effective implementation at all stages of civil & criminal DV cases, as well as a new national project, the Firearms Pilot Site Initiative, through which the NCJFCJ & other national experts will provide communities with in-depth TA, training, & other support.

Link to register for webinar: here

*A similar webinar with information specific for tribal communities will be held May 22, but people from all communities are encouraged to attend whichever one is most convenient.

Closed captioning will be provided. The webinar will be 60 minutes long and will be recorded and made available to individuals who cannot participate in the live webinar. If you have further questions regarding this event, please contact Alicia Lord at alord@ncjfcj.org.

 

Richard Wagamese Walks On

A talented author who used his gifts to draw attention to the intergenerational trauma faced by his family and many others as a result of the Residential Schools in Canada. Such a loss at only 61 years old. Our deepest sympathies to his family and friends.

Here is a link to the CBC article about his passing.

Ending Violence Against Indigenous Women as a Step Toward Empowerment – Event

Link to the announcement here

TOGETHER WE ARE STRONGER:

Ending Violence Against Indigenous Women as a Step Towards Empowerment

SAVE THE DATE

Wednesday, March 15, 2017
10:30 a.m.

Salvation Army
221 E 52nd St.
(Downstairs Room)
New York, NY 10022

Join us to recognize, strengthen, and honor the global movement to end violence against indigenous women.

Indigenous women around the world experience disproportionate levels of violence and murder and multiple, intersecting forms of discrimination because they are indigenous and because they are women. Too often, national justice systems fail to respond to this violence, leaving women without protection or meaningful access to justice. In this event, indigenous women leaders will speak to the situation of violence against indigenous women in the United States and Guatemala.

• Learn about barriers to safety facing American Indian and Alaska Native women in the United States, and their successes in restoring indigenous sovereignty to address violence against women.

• Learn about the grassroots movement to stop the trafficking of indigenous women in the United States.

• Learn about the spectrum of violence facing Mayan women in Guatemala and their strategies of resistance.

Panelists will also discuss strategies for urging states to advance the rights of indigenous peoples and women affirmed in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the American Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

For more information, email Jana L. Walker, at jwalker@indianlaw.org.

replacement image- copy

Alaska Tribal Court Selected for Dependency Court Project

The Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Child Dependency Court under the leadership of Judge Debra O’Gara been selected by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) as one of six new courts to join their Implementation Sites Project, which helps to improve outcomes for abused and neglected children and their families.

Full press release available here alaska-implementation-pr-final-02232017.

From the release:

The NCJFCJ Implementation Sites Project, which is funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, provides child abuse and neglect courts with training, technical assistance and support to guide program improvement, sustainability and performance. As part of their involvement in this project, Implementation Sites are expected to implement meaningful change, evaluate progress as well as share challenges and successes with other courts across the country.

“Tribal justice systems are growing and evolving to address to the needs and issues of tribal communities. It is vitally important that tribal courts continue to learn, benefit, and share information through the NCJFCJ’s Implementation Site Project,” said Nikki Borchardt Campbell, Executive Director of the National American Indian Judges Court Association.

The Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Child Dependency Court, in Juneau, Alaska, began last year through an extensive partnership with the Tribal and Youth Services and the State of Alaska Office of Children Services. In the last decade, the Tribe’s court system has grown quickly beginning with child welfare including child support and paternity cases. Recently, the Tribal court has begun to hear domestic violence protection orders, custody, divorce, guardianship, and adoption cases. The Tribal court is also developing a juvenile wellness court, focused primarily on early intervention and prevention for youth whom are at risk of being involved in the criminal justice system.

“Being a part of the NCJFCJ’s Implementation Sites Project will not only help grow and expand our Tribal court in the child welfare area of services, but would greatly benefit our court’s needs for technical assistance, practical tools, and collaborative assessment,” said the Honorable Debra O’Gara, lead judge of the project.

“We look forward to collaborating with the NCJFCJ to strengthen the court’s infrastructure through data collection, forms and templates, staff training, and greater access to current research and trends in child and family needs to build up the infrastructure to handle the growing case load. I firmly believe that we have much to learn from the knowledge and experience of other judges and courts around the nation on how to best expand and improve the court’s outcomes for our children and families.”

Congressional Resolution Aimed at Creating Awareness on Missing and Murdered American Indian and Alaska Native Women

Press release available press-release-hill-briefing-2_16_17

From the press release:

“Indigenous women go missing twice—once in real life and a second time in the news” said Amanda Takes War Bonnet, Public Education Specialist of the Native Women’s Society of the Great Plains.  War Bonnet was part of a panel during the Moving Ahead In Addressing Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Efforts to Address Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls congressional briefing held Feb. 15, to provided legislators and the public with an overview of this urgent issue.  . . .

To help bring attention to these tragic, often undocumented crimes,  Montana Senators Steve Daines and Jon Tester introduced Senate Resolution 60 on Monday, Feb. 13 — a resolution calling for the designation of May 5, 2017 as a “National Day of Awareness for Missing and Murdered Native Women and Girls.” Senators James Lankford (OK), Cory Gardner (CO), Al Franken (MN), John Hoeven (ND), and Tom Udall (NM) co-sponsored the resolution. Speaking at the briefing, Sen. Daines noted that May 5th was chosen because it is the birthday of Hanna Harris, a Northern Cheyenne woman who went missing in July 2013 and was found murdered several days later. . . .

Nearly 200 tribal, national, and state organizations have supported the resolution, which calls for designating May 5, 2017 as a day to honor the lives of those missing and murdered and demonstrate solidarity with families that have lost a loved one through violence. Speakers urged participants to contact their Senators and ask them to co-sponsor the resolution.

NCJFCJ Opening for Site Manager with Tribal Experience, Open Until Feb. 20

The National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges (NCJFCJ) has posted an opening for a site manager with substantial experience working with tribes and tribal courts. Applications will be accepted until February 20.

For the complete job description click here

The Child Abuse and Neglect’s multi-disciplinary and highly dedicated team directs its work on helping judges improve court and systems’ handling of child abuse and neglect cases. The Site Manager position requires a unique blend of knowledge, skills, and abilities. This position will work primarily with tribes/tribal courts, but also can be tasked to work with other types of courts (e.g., dependency, delinquency, juvenile drug courts, dual status, etc.) as needed. The Site Manager will be required to build a substantial knowledge base around private and public funded projects that focus on improving court practice in child abuse and neglect cases; implement the principles of collaboration among court, agencies, and community; develop content expertise on issues common across system-involved children and families (e.g., trauma, substance abuse, etc.); and have experience and knowledge in the juvenile justice and dependency systems and especially in tribal court systems. This position will work as a member of the broader project court team, as well as perform collaborative planning and decision-making with other staff and projects across the organization.

Strong emphasis is placed on the following experience and abilities:
  • Providing public presentations and/or on-site technical assistance to tribal and state courts
  • Independent thinking and analytical skills, as well as a demonstrated ability to quickly synthesize complex information
  • Writing policy briefs and papers
  • Working collaboratively with partners and system representatives
  • Substantial experience working with tribes and tribal courts
  • Experience and knowledge of delinquency, or domestic violence systems; ICWA and VAWA highly desirable

The NCJFCJ is also hiring for the following positions:

Judge-in-Residence

Program Specialist

Details for all positions available here

New: ICWA Guide for Tribal Governments and Leaders

New from the Capacity Building Center for Tribes: ICWA Guide for Tribal Governments and Leaders. Available here, pdf here.

Our Children, Our Sovereignty, Our Culture, Our Choice

A word from the authors: Our tribes are threatened by the removal of our youngest and most vulnerable members, our children. As leaders we want to make informed decisions to protect the future of our tribe, our culture, our children and families. Historically, we have seen state and federal programs compromise our dignity and culture by breaking up our families and tribes. Even today we hear of unwarranted removal of our Indian children and the attempts to keep them separated from their culture and tribal identity. The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), when complied with, can help prevent these unwarranted removals and ensure Indian children are kept safe while remaining with their families. The purpose of this Guide is to recommend actions that tribal leadership can take towards ensuring compliance with ICWA.

The recommendations that appear in this guide were made by Tribal Court judges, Tribal attorneys, Tribal educators who train on ICWA, Tribal legislators, a former Tribal Governor/Social Services Director, Counsel for the County (who was also a Tribal member), and Directors of Social Services for Tribal child welfare programs. It is important to note that these are recommendations, not mandates, made by individuals who work in various arenas in child welfare.

Ysleta del Sur Chief Judge Lawrence Lujan Appointed Commissioner to Texas Supreme Court’s Permanent Judicial Commission for Children, Youth and Families

From the National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA) Facebook Page:

NAICJA Vice President Appointed Commissioner to the Texas Supreme Court’s Permanent Judicial Commission for Children, Youth and Families

Our Tribal Courts not only serve our sovereign communities but also seek partnerships at the state and federal level. These partnerships enhance Indian Country legal services and most importantly put our tribal nations in key leadership positions that promote the welfare of our community members and the sovereignty of all Tribal Courts.

Congratulations on your new appointment Chief Judge Lawrence Lujan of the Ysleta del Sur Pubelo!

 

 

 

image-1image