GTB’s Derek Bailey: “Protect Our Sacred Water”

Here.

An excerpt:

AS RESPECTED TRIBAL ELDER AND FORMER TRIBAL CHAIRMAN (LITTLE TRAVERSE BAY BANDS OF ODAWA INDIANS) FRANK ETTAWAGESHIK ONCE STATED, “THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT DEFINING ELEMENT OF THE PLACE WE LIVE, WHAT MAKES THIS PLACE UNIQUE IN THE ENTIRE WORLD, IS THE GREAT LAKES AND THE WATERS THAT RECHARGE THESE LAKES FROM THE SPRINGS, CREEKS, STREAMS AND RIVERS THAT MAKE UP THIS VAST WATERSHED. WE SPEAK FOR AND HONOR THE WATERS AS THE LIFE-BLOOD OF OUR MOTHER EARTH AS AN INTEGRAL PART OF OUR TRADITIONAL SPIRITUALITY. AS NATIVE NATIONS WE UTILIZE THESE WATERS TO DEFINE OUR BOUNDARIES, TRANSPORT OURSELVES AND TRADE GOODS, FISH FOR OUR FOOD AND COMMERCE, AND ENJOY THEIR VALUE FOR RECREATION AND A STRONG ECONOMY.”

Derek Bailey Appears to Have Lost the Dem. Primary for the 101st State House Seat

Here are the unofficial returns.

Benzie County went to Derek Bailey over Alan O’Shea 727-294.

Leelanau County went to Bailey 782-513.

Mason County went to O’Shea 418-257.

Manistee County went to O’Shea 1449 to 635.

 

Fixing Carcieri for Michigan

Fixing Carcieri for Michigan

Matthew L.M. Fletcher

Congressional action to correct the Supreme Court’s decision in Carcieri v. Salazar would cost American taxpayers nothing and would be an enormous win for Michigan tribes and the Michigan economy. Carcieri, a decision that undermines the certainty of the Department of Interior’s authority to acquire land in trust for some Indian tribes, makes borrowing money for several Michigan tribes more difficult and more expensive – for some Michigan tribes, the price to borrow money for capital growth increases by millions in increased interest or even the inability to borrow. In short, Carcieri costs the Michigan economy jobs and economic growth.

The Carcieri Decision

The Carcieri decision held that the Department of Interior could not take land into trust for the benefit of the Narragansett Indian Tribe in Rhode Island under Section 5 of the Indian Reorganization Act (“IRA”), a statute that authorizes the Secretary of Interior to do so for any Indian tribe. The IRA’s definition of “Indian tribe” includes any tribe “now under federal jurisdiction.” The Interior Department had interpreted the IRA to authorize trust land acquisitions for tribes under federal jurisdiction at the time of the application, using federal recognition as a proxy for federal jurisdiction. But the Supreme Court held that the Narragansetts were under state jurisdiction at the time of the enactment of the IRA in 1934, and so Interior could not take land into trust for them.

The Department of Interior had “administratively terminated” several Michigan Indian tribes – all of the six Ottawa and Potawatomi tribes now federally recognized – in the late 19th century. These tribes are “treaty tribes,” meaning that they have an ongoing treaty relationship with the federal government that has never been extinguished by Congress. The Sixth Circuit has recognized that “administrative termination” was an illegal administrative act, and the concurrences and dissent in Carcieri also recognized that the Michigan tribes probably were “under federal jurisdiction” in 1934. Still, those tribes, and two other tribes in the Upper Peninsula that became federally recognized in the 1970s and 1980s may be affected by Carcieri.

Impacts on Michigan Tribes

The Michigan tribes are among the tribes most adversely affected by the Carcieri decision, even though every one of them is a treaty tribe. They are affected in two important ways:

First, each of the tribes potentially affected by Carcieri may be forced to engage in a costly, protracted historical and legal determination by the Interior Department that they were “under federal jurisdiction” in 1934. In other words, the tribes may have to expend precious tribal resources to prove that they are eligible tribes in the frivolous lawsuits that are destined to be filed. There are currently 62 non-gaming related Michigan tribes trust applications pending in the Department of Interior now. These applications are for agriculture, housing, public safety, and other infrastructure projects. Many of these projects involve multi-million dollar construction jobs and long-term job creation. Every day that these trust applications are delayed slows down Michigan job growth and economic development. Nationally, a Carcieri fix is estimated to generate 140,000 jobs, many of those in Michigan.

Derek Bailey, the former chairman of my tribe, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, testified before Congress in 2009 about the clear economic consequences of trust land acquisition delays:

As one example, Parcel 45 in Antrim County is a 78-acre parcel that is zoned for residential development by the local township and county. In order to obtain this zoning, we spent 1.5 million dollars of tribal money for roads and for sewer, water, and electrical infrastructure to render the parcels ready for individual housing. The parcel contains two homes owned by tribal members, two Grand Traverse Band rental homes, and 22 empty lots available for Tribal members to construct housing. However, until the land is placed into trust, tribal members cannot obtain the Bureau leases necessary to secure housing financing.

Second, the cloud of Carcieri stifles any development project by potentially affected Michigan tribes. Carcieri increases risks to lenders – the risk that a court finds that a tribe is not eligible because of the Carcieri case, even if low, increases exposure – and that translates to millions of dollars in increased interest rates and occasionally shuts down the project altogether by eliminating the ability of the tribe to borrow money at all. Carcieri has all but killed off investment in Indian country. This issue extends to tribes that may have a Carcieri problem and tribes that already have established economic enterprises. Lower Michigan tribes, especially in southwest Michigan, are enormous economic engines that have generated massive economic growth despite the specter of Carcieri. Relieving these economic engines of this unnecessary burden is only going to improve Michigan’s economy.

In conclusion, fixing Carcieri is costless to American taxpayers and a big win-win for Michigan and Michigan tribes.

GTB Chairman Bailey to Run for Congress

Here.

An excerpt:

Peshawbestown, Mich.— The campaign to represent northern Michigan’s 1st Congressional District is expected to gain a new candidate this weekend.

Derek Bailey, tribal chairman of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians, will announce his intention Saturday to run for Congress. He would face ex-state Rep. Gary McDowell of Rudyard in the Democratic August primary. McDowell lost in November to Republican Dr. Dan Benishek of Crystal Falls in a heated race for the seat held by longtime U.S. Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Menominee.

The 1st District is shaping up to be Michigan’s most hotly contested election and one with national implications. Democrats are targeting it as one of 25 they can win back in 2012 to retake the House.

Bailey, 38, was elected in 2008 as the youngest chairman of the tribe, a sovereign nation that was federally recognized in 1980.

In 1984, the tribe of more than 4,000 citizens became one of the first in the state to open a casino, the Leelanau Sands Casino. The Turtle Creek Casino and the Grand Traverse Resort and Spa followed.

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Northern Express Profile of GTB Chairman Derek Bailey

Here is the article.

An excerpt:

Chairman Derek Bailey of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) recently postponed a family getaway to the Upper Peninsula to speak at a memorial service. These constant schedule changes and being accessible 24/7 as the Tribal Chairman have become the lifestyle Bailey and his family have adopted since his election three years ago.

“We were looking forward to our trip, but I was asked to speak at a memorial service for Helen Hornbeck Tanner. I considered it not only an honor but my obligation to be there,” said Bailey. “Tanner, while not Native American, played several crucial roles in the recent history for Indian tribes of the Great Lakes region. She is not the only reason but she certainly is a key reason why we (the GTB) are where we are at today. It was important that I let her family and friends know how much we appreciate what she did for us and equally important that our tribal communities know of her importance.”

TANNER’S CONTRIBUTION
Tanner, a long time Beluah resident, was considered the leading authority on the Native American history of the Great Lakes. She authored several books and research papers during her tenure as a professor at the University of Michigan and as a senior research fellow at the Newberry Library in Chicago. Her “Atlas of Great Lakes Indian History,” documented the displacement of Indian communities from 1640 to 1871. Her research and expertise played a crucial role in upholding Indian treaty rights with the federal government, including fishing rights on the Great Lakes.

Bailey’s presence at the memorial service marked the type of leadership style those within the GTB have come to expect. That leadership style has also made its mark throughout Northern Michigan, as well as in Lansing and even in Washington D.C..

In 2008 at the age of 36, Bailey became the fifth and the youngest Tribal Chairman elected by the GTB. Bailey has set out a course to build partnerships throughout Michigan and in the nation’s capital. In just three years of creating collaborations and partnerships, some in the Northern Michigan business community are calling on Bailey to consider either running for the Michigan State Senate or U.S. Congress.

BOTH SIDES OF AN ISSUE
“I think Derek would make an excellent representative for Northern Michigan in Lansing or Washington D.C.,” said Don Coe, managing partner of Black Star Farms Winery and chairman of the Michigan Commission on Agriculture and Rural Development. “What he has been able to accomplish in just a couple of years as tribal chairman is remarkable and his leadership skills in Lansing or Congress would be a valuable asset for us here in Northern Michigan. Derek has worked hard to not only better the GTB but also the greater Northern Michigan community.”

Coe is impressed with Bailey’s ability to understand both sides of an issue and bring opposing sides together.
“What I like is his ability to represent the GTB positions on issues and put those forward in a way that that is not threatening but accepting, and he is also able to put forward the issues of others back to his membership,” said Coe.

Coe adds that Bailey is also an exceptional listener, and has attracted the attention of the Obama administration. “You don’t call the White House, they call you and the Obama administration has been calling.”

That most recent call came a few weeks back when President Obama visited Holland and the White House called Bailey to let him know that the president requested his presence in Holland for a brief meeting.

GTB Chair to Attend World Education Expo

Article here.

An excerpt:

 Representing a five-county region of Northwest Michigan, Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Tribal Chairman Derek Bailey will participate in the 2011 World Forum on Early Care and Education.

The event will be held May 3 through May 6 in Honolulu, Hawaii.

During the World Forum, Bailey will meet with 40-50 Global Leaders to exchange knowledge and experiences about programs that directly improve and enhance care and education of young children.

Bailey was asked to represent the five-county region that includes Antrim, Benzie, Grand Traverse, Kalkaska, and Leelanau counties, and to participate in the Global Forum, by a group of organizations that include the Traverse Bay Area Intermediate School District (TBA-ISD), Rotary Charities, the NorthSky Nonprofit Network, and Mother Goose Time.  The five-county region is the region served by the TBA-ISD.

Although Bailey is the Tribal Chairman of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa & Chippewa Indians, he says he will participate in the World Forum as a representative of the five-county community.

Derek Bailey on Michigan Intergovernmental Relations

From the Traverse City Record-Eagle:

This past October, at the Great Lakes Bioneers conference held at Northwestern Michigan College, I participated in a presentation with Traverse City Mayor Chris Bzdok. Our presentation focused on “Participating in Governance,” and throughout our discussion an emerging theme became apparent: Citizens feel a stronger need to be connected as a part of their respective governments.

Following our presentation and questions that were asked, I thought about what this means and how elected officials could improve this connection. I believe we are, now more than ever, asking for true representative democracy of our elected officials. Interestingly, this is a common and expected understanding among citizens of tribal governments whom tribal officials are elected to serve.

An elected tribal official is not defined within a political party, yet represents a sovereign nation in its entirety and its citizenship. There is a strong need to build relationships with other decision-makers and leaders.

To better understand, it is truly “government-to-government” when developing relationships with local, state and federal officials. Developing and maintaining interactions that occur daily, weekly and monthly is a definite advantage in accomplishing work efforts and activities, and for making the best decisions possible.

Having served on Tribal Council since 2004, and more recently as tribal chairman, I am routinely impressed with the high level of commitment to northern Michigan and our beautiful state by local and state representatives.

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GTB & Derek Bailey Look Back on 2010

News article (and video) here, via Pechanga:

TRAVERSE CITY, MI — Tribal Chairman Derek Bailey looks back at 2010 with appreciation.

For him, it’s a year that broke down barriers and allowed him to pursue his goals as a tribal leader.

“When I campaigned to the tribal members I said that one of the commitments I bring forth, if elected chair, would be to increase our presence locally, state wide and nationally. Now I’m not taking away from what past tribal leaders have accomplished, but I wanted to build upon that,” Bailey said.

In the spring, the Grand Traverse Band received national recognition when President Obama announced he would be appointing Bailey to the National Advisory Council on Indian education.

“I know with my appointment to the National Advisory Council of Indian education, early education is a huge emphasis for me…significant brain development occurs between 0-5 years old. The least amount of funding goes in at that time.”

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