IPR: “Emails show Enbridge private security keeping tabs on activists in the Straits of Mackinac”

Here.

“The fact that myself and other elected leaders of tribes have taken a stance against the pipeline doesn’t mean that our law enforcement agencies don’t have an interest in understanding what’s going on at the Straits with the pipeline,” says Bryan Newland, Chairman of the Bay Mills Indian Community. “It would be just like Enbridge reaching out to the Michigan State Police despite the fact that our attorney general and governor are opposed to the pipeline in the straits.”

Kyle Whyte is a professor at Michigan State University and a citizen of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation who has written about Standing Rock. He says there’s a trend of companies trying to control public advocacy behind the scenes.

“Instead of companies proposing risky projects being subject to oversight, it’s citizens concerned about preventing risks who are subject to oversight from those seeking to impose the risks,” he says. “There is a problem of mutual accountability here.”

Saginaw Chippewa and State of Michigan to begin co-management of Sanilac Petroglyphs Historic State Park

Here.

Ezhibiigadek asin//written on stone (Sanilac Petroglyphs) will mark the first state/tribal co-­management of a state park in Michigan. This comes during the centennial of the Michigan State Park Commission and the bicentennial of the 1819 Treaty of Saginaw, in which the Anishinaabeg ceded Land to the United States encompassing ezhibiigadek asin.

Governor Whitmer Appoints Whitney Gravelle to Michigan Women’s Commission

Press release here.

“Whitney B. Gravelle, of Brimley, is the tribal attorney for the Bay Mills Indian Community and the former chief judge of the Bay Mills Tribal Court. Ms. Gravelle is active in the tribal community mentoring indigenous youth through the Boys & Girls Club Tribal Youth Program. She earned her Juris Doctor degree from the Michigan State University College of Law. Ms. Gravelle is appointed to succeed Nicole DeMarco, whose term expired July 15, 2019, for a term expiring July 15, 2022. “

 

Confederation of Michigan Tribal Education Directors Seek Public Comment on Social Studies Standards

PUBLIC COMMENT IS OPEN FROM: APRIL 10, 2019-MAY 9, 2019

Announcement/guidance form here.

To comment online, use the online Social Studies Standard Survey. Scroll to the second paragraph and click “online survey.” For more information and suggestions, see pages 3-4 of the announcement.

Upcoming Listen & Learn Meetings

To comment in person, attend a meeting below and fill out a form requesting to speak. For more information, see page 2 of the announcement.

Lansing May 2 6:00-8:00pm today!
Michigan Historical Center and Library, 702 W. Kalamazoo, Lansing, MI 48915

Grand Rapids May 6 6:00-8:00pm
Kent Intermediate School District
2930 Knapp Road
Grand Rapids, MI 49525

Gaylord May 7 6:00-8:00pm
University Center Gaylord
80 Livingston Blvd.
Gaylord, MI 49735

Sault Ste. Marie May 8 6:00-8:00pm
Eastern Upper Peninsula Intermediate School District
315 Armory Place
Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783

Escanaba May 9 6:00-8:00pm
Delta Schoolcraft Intermediate School District
2525 3rd Avenue S.
Escanaba, MI 49829

Call for Proposals: Edweying Naabing // Looking at the Past and Present Symposium at MSU

Edweying Naabing // Looking at the Past and Present Symposium

Michigan State University

September 20-21, 2019

Proposals due May 30, 2019

PDF version here.

MSUTreatyComm2019_call_web

Marking the 200th commemoration of the Treaty of Saginaw, MSU’s American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program, Indigenous Law and Policy Center, and Native American Institute invite proposals for Edweying Naabing // Looking at the Past and Present Symposium.

All are welcome to submit proposals and can refer to the list of possible topics for presentation ideas.

Those interested should submit a 250-word proposal and 100-word biography to indigenous@law.msu.edu by May 30, 2019.

About the Symposium: The inaugural symposium addresses the history of the Treaty 1819 and its ongoing effects for Indigenous-settler relationships at Land-Grant institutions, such as MSU. More generally, this conference focuses on Indigenous histories, presence, and futures on Anishinaabewaki and across Turtle Island.

The event is free and open to the public. Youth are highly encouraged to attend, especially those interested in becoming familiar with opportunities at MSU.