NNALSA Petition For Diverse, Inclusive, and Supportive Law Schools

National Native American Law Students Association (“National NALSA”) is disheartened by the slow progression of law schools in becoming institutions which are inclusive, understanding, and supportive of their Native students. [1] National NALSA is an organization which strives to support Native law students, Federal Indian Law, Tribal Law, and traditional forms of governance. As such, National NALSA is requesting that law schools take steps to rectify this situation to foster an environment that is supportive of Native students and promotes diversity within law schools generally. National NALSA sees issues within three main categories: (1) recruitment, (2) academics, and (3) cultural awareness.

Petition here.

 

Congratulations Class of 2019

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Stole design and creation by Jenna Marie Wood, Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians. From left to right: Annabel Shea, Sault Ste Marie Band of Chippewa Indians; Margaret Shea, Sault Ste Marie Band of Chippewa Indians; Emmy Scott, HoChunk/Spokane/Arikara; Lauren Sutter; Maurisa Paris Bell, Eastern Shoshone Tribe; L. Clare Johnson, Cherokee Nation; Kayla Noel Pederson; not pictured, Glen Anstine, Picuris Pueblo.

 

Congratulations to the Michigan State University College of Law Class of 2019!

Yesterday’s celebration honored the graduates of the MSU Native American Law Student Association and the Indigenous Law and Policy Center. Today, they walked across stage to receive their diplomas. We look forward to hearing of the many contributions to Indian Country that these passionate, dedicated lawyers will make.  Here’s to happy endings and exciting beginnings!

 

 

Maurisa Bell, NNALSA 3L of the Year

 

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National NALSA 3L of the Year Award recipient, Maurisa Bell (right).

Maurisa Bell grew up on the Wind River Reservation in Riverton, Wyoming. She is an enrolled member of the Eastern Shoshone Tribe and was also raised around her Northern Arapaho family. In 2015, she graduated from Montana State University in Bozeman, MT and completed the Pre-Law Summer Institute program during the summer of 2016. While in law school, Maurisa served as Vice President and Treasurer for the MSU-NALSA, an Area representative for National-NALSA, and volunteered as a student mentor for the Indigenous Law and Policy Center.

She spent her summers in Washington, D.C. working for the Department of Justice’s Office of Tribal Justice; the National Indian Gaming Commission; and Dentons, US LLP in their Native American Law and Policy practice group. She is a dedicated and driven leader who, in just a few weeks, will graduate from the Michigan State University College of Law.

Maurisa will work for Dentons upon graduation, pursuing her passion in helping tribes and tribal communities.

Congratulations, Maurisa!