Two Michigan Tribal Citizens Selected for State of Michigan’s First Environmental Justice Advisory Council [Bryan Newland and John Petoskey]

Here:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   
January 23, 2020   
Gov Contact: BrownT56@michigan.gov   
EGLE Contact: Greenbergj@michigan.gov 

Twenty-one Michiganders Selected for the State’s First Environmental Justice Advisory Council 

 LANSING, Mich. – Twenty-one Michiganders have been selected to the state’s first Michigan Advisory Council for Environmental Justice (MAC EJ) under the direction of Governor Gretchen Whitmer, the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) announced today. 

 “Since taking office, I’ve been deliberate and focused on protecting our Great Lakes, cleaning up our drinking water, and combating the real-life impacts of climate change,” said Whitmer. “To address ongoing environmental justice issues, it was absolutely critical that those impacted daily have a seat at the table. We must ensure that the implementation and enforcement of environmental protections, regulations, and policies in Michigan will be fair and meaningful to all Michiganders, regardless of geography, race, color, origin, or income. Actions like these will help to further rebuild trust in our state government.” 

The Interagency Environmental Justice Response Team is led by Regina Strong, the state’s Environmental Justice Public Advocate. The MAC EJ will provide public and impacted community input for the directors appointed to the Response Team. The Response Team is also planning regional roundtables around the state to ensure that as many people as possible are at the table on environmental issues.

“Meeting people where they are is vital to our commitment to making Michigan a leader in environmental justice,” said EGLE Director Liesl Clark. “Creating the Michigan Advisory Council on Environmental Justice is an important step in building the framework to ensure all Michiganders benefit equitably from our environmental laws and regulations. Through both the Office of Environmental Justice Public Advocate and the Interagency Environmental Justice Response Team, we are working to address inequities that impact communities across this state. The creation of this advisory council will play an important role in helping us achieve that goal.” 

The following individuals have been appointed to the Michigan Advisory Council on Environmental Justice:   

[moving them to the front]

Bryan Newland, of Brimley, is an active member of the Bay Mills Indian Community and the president and chairman of the Executive Council. Mr. Newland is an attorney with Fletcher Law and he earned his Juris Doctor degree from the Michigan State University College of Law.  

John Petoskey, of Northport, is a member of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians. Mr. Petoskey is currently pursuing his Juris Doctor degree and Master of Science in Environmental Justice and Policy at the University of Michigan. 

Federal Court Dismisses Challenge to BLM Approval of Winter Exploration in Arctic Petroleum Reserve

Here are the materials in Native Village of Nuiqsut v. BLM (D. Alaska):

5 Amended Complaint

27 Plaintiffs Motion for Summary J

30 Federal Response

31 ConocoPhillips Response

33 Reply

46 DCT Order

Federal Court Transfers Narragansett Consultation Claims against Federal Highway Admin. to D.C. District Court

Here are the materials in Narragansett Indian Tribe v. Hendrickson (D. R.I.):

12 Motion to Dismiss

14 Tribe Motion to Transfer Venue

16 US Opposition to 14

17 Reply in Support of 14

18 Tribe Opposition to 12

20 Reply in Support of 12

21 Tribe Motion for Reconsideration

23 DCt Order Granting 14 on Reconsideration

Complaint here.

Most Claims against Federal Approvals of Keystone XL Allowed to Proceed

Here is the order in Rosebud Sioux Tribe v. Trump (D. Mont.):

92 DCT Order

Briefs here.

Sarah Deer and Elizabeth Kronk Warner on Trump, Indian Country, Sexual Assault, and Extractive Industries

Sarah Deer and Elizabeth Ann Kronk Warner have posted “Raping Indian Country” on SSRN. Here is the abstract:

In this article, we have examined the policies of the Trump Administration as they relate to extractive development on and near Indian country, and policies related to the protection of Native people from rape and sexual assault. As demonstrated above, the Administration’s policies are likely to increase both the environmental and physical vulnerabilities of Native people. Native people will not only likely face exasperated physical insecurity, but their environments will likely be increasingly stripped on natural resources. As a result, the raping of Indian county continues. But, this article is not without hope. At least two ways forward, improvements upon the status quo exist. Tribal governments possess the requisite capacity to address the environmental and criminal challenges presented here. Further, changes to federal law, such as the Oliphant fix suggested above, provide meaningful opportunities for change. The rape of Indian country envisioned in this article is not a foregone conclusion; together change can protect our land and bodies.

Highly recommended.