FMC Corp. v. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Cert Petition [Updated]

Here:

cert-petition.pdf

Questions presented:

1. Whether the Ninth Circuit correctly holds that tribal jurisdiction over nonmembers is established whenever a Montana exception is met, or whether, as the Seventh and Eighth Circuits have held, a court must also determine that the exercise of such jurisdiction stems from the tribe’s inherent authority to set conditions on entry, preserve tribal self-government, or control internal relations.

2. Whether the Ninth Circuit has construed the Montana exceptions to swallow the general rule that tribes lack jurisdiction over nonmembers.

Lower court materials here.

Update:

Brief in Opposition

Top 10 American Indian Law Cases of 2019

It was a busy 2018 Term at the Supreme Court. Here are the top cases (although the top case is not a Supreme Court case):

1. Brackeen v. Bernhardt — This has to be the top case, even beating out three Supreme Court cases. Foundational doctrines of Indian law are at stake, state governments are facing off against the United States, and virtually every Indian tribe has affirmed support for the Indian Child Welfare Act. After expedited briefing and argument, the Fifth Circuit reversed a decision striking down ICWA. Now the court will rehear Brackeen en banc.

2. Sharp v. Murphy (formerly Carpenter v. Murphy) — This case captured the attention of Indian country more for the procedural drama (never thought those two words would ever go together) than the merits. A death penalty appeal in which the parties (state, tribe, guy-on-death-row, and US) barely mention that fact, Murphy is a reservation boundaries case that makes for exciting, if not accurate, media (Oklahoma could return to Indian reservation status!). The parties sparred at oral argument, the Court asked for more briefing, the This Land podcast went national, the end of the Term approached, and then . . . nothing. The apparent 4-4 tie of the justices led the Court to push the case to the next Term, and then more nothing. Now the Court has granted cert in McGirt v. Oklahoma, likely to decide the same issues as Murphy but with a full complement of judges.

3. Herrera v. Wyoming — The Court ruled 5-4 that the 1868 treaty right to hunt on unoccupied lands applied to the lands of the Bighorn National Forest. The Court also conclusively overruled Ward v. Racehorse, an ancient decision holding that statehood could abrogate treaty rights.

4. Washington State Dept. of Licensing v. Cougar Den — The Court ruled 5-4, but with no majority opinion, that a treaty right to travel on highways preempted a state tax on fuels moving through grounds transportation (or alternatively, granted a right to move goods without state interference).

The rest of the cases are lower court matters ranked by number of views on Turtle Talk. Here they are:

5. Williams v. Big Picture Loans — The Fourth Circuit ruled that tribal sovereign immunity applies to tribally owned businesses that conduct internet lending operations.

6. Swinomish Tribe v. BNSF — This case is pending before the Ninth Circuit. It received outsized attention because of an order by the panel to BNSF requiring it to explain how its characterization of legal authorities, the record, and the arguments of the tribe met its duty of candor to the court.

7. Free v. Dellinger — This case in the Western District of Oklahoma sought an order enjoining tribal jurisdiction over a nonmember. The case likely received a bunch of hits because that nonmember was Kalyn Free.

8. Davilla v. Enable Midstream Partners — The Tenth Circuit last January ordered the defendant to remove a pipeline from Indian lands.

9. Spurr v. Pope — The Sixth Circuit affirmed tribal court jurisdiction to issue a civil PPO against a nonmember under the 2013 VAWA tribal jurisdictional provisions.

10. FMC Corp. v. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes — The Ninth Circuit affirmed tribal jurisdiction over a nonmember, confirming a tribal court judgment involving millions. FMC was represented by a noted SCT practitioner, so expect a serious Supreme Court challenge in 2020.

Ninth Circuit Affirms Tribal Jurisdiction in FMC v. Shoshone-Bannock

Here is the opinion in FMC Corp. v. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes.

Briefs here.

UPDATE:

En Banc Petition

Amicus Brief

CA9 Order Denying Petition

Ninth Circuit Briefs in FMC Corp. v. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes

Here:

FMC Opening Brief

Tribal Appellee Brief

FMC Reply

Tribe Reply

Prior posts here.

Federal Court Holds Shoshone-Bannock Tribes Have Authority to Impose $1.5M Annual Permit Fee on FMC Corp.

Here is the order in FMC Corp. v. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (D. Idaho):

64-1 Tribe Motion on Montana 1

65-1 Tribe Motion on Montana 2

66-1 Tribe Motion on Tribal Process

67-2 FMC Motion on Tribal Process

67-3 FMC Motion on Montana 1

67-4 FMC Motion on Montana 2

72 FMC Opposition re Montana 1

73 FMC Opposition re Montana 2

74 FMC Opposition re Tribal Process

75 Tribe Response re Process

76 Tribe Response re Montana 1

77 Tribe Response re Montana 2

80 Tribe Reply re Process

81 Tribe Reply re Montana 1

82 Tribe Reply re Montana 2

83 FMC Reply re Process

84 FMC Reply re Montana 2

85 FMC Reply re Montana 1

95 DCT Order

News coverage here.

Federal Court Denies Discovery into Tribal Judicial Bias Claims

Here is the order in FMC Corp. v. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (D. Idaho):

43 DCT Order Denying Discovery

An excerpt:

To allow a litigant to conduct full-blown discovery here, after he failed to conduct discovery in the tribal court litigation, would ignore National Farmers and Iowa Mutual. Those cases directed that all issues be fully presented to the tribal court so that it might cure any problems and give the federal court the benefit of its expertise. If a due process issue like judicial bias is not fully developed through discovery before being presented to the tribal court – and the litigant simply sits on his discovery rights until he gets into federal court – the tribal court never gets a chance to review the discovery, apply its expertise, and cure any unfair judicial bias revealed by the discovery. That is antithetical to the analysis of National Farmers and Iowa Mutual.

Briefs here. The tribal court decision below is here.

Materials (so far) in FMC v. Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (Tribal Court Jurisdiction and Enforcement of Tribal Judgment)

Here:

10 FMC Complaint

12 Tribe Answer

36 FMC Brief re Discovery

35 Tribe Brief re Discovery

37 FMC Response

38 Shoshone-Bannock Response

H/T to law360.

The tribal court decision below is here.