Sovereignty Symposium Writing Competition

The Supreme Court of Oklahoma and the Sovereignty Symposium, Inc. are sponsoring a writing competition open to all students enrolled in an accredited law school in the United States, its territories or Canada.

In conjunction with Sovereignty Symposium XXXI, which will be held June 6-7, 2018 at the Skirvin Hilton Hotel, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, a scholarly collection of legal and historical writings will be presented to all participants.  Legal libraries all over the United States regularly solicit copies of the publications for their collections.   The subject matter of the paper may be on any area of the law relating to Native Americans or other indigenous peoples.  First, second, and third prizes in the amounts of $750.00; $500.00; and $250.00 will be awarded.  The winning entry will also be published in the 2018 Symposium compendium of materials.  Second and third place entries will be published if space permits.

The entries in the writing competition must be not less than thirty (30) single-spaced pages nor more than fifty (50) single-spaced pages in length.  The paper used shall be 8-1/2” x 11” in size.  The title of the paper, the name of the author and a current mailing address and telephone number must be placed on a cover page.  Only the title of the paper should appear at the top of the first page of the text.  The author’s name should appear on the cover page only.  Papers must be submitted in Word or Word Perfect format.  E-mail the formatted version to kyle.shifflett@oscn.net.  Use a 12-point font in Times New Roman format.  Again, the document should be single spaced.  The left and right margins must be 2”; the top and bottom margins must be 1.5”.

Papers are evaluated for: Timelines of Subject; Originality; Legal Analysis; Use of Authority; Creativity of Arguments; Strength and Logic of Conclusions; Grammar; Punctuation and Writing Style.

Entries must be received no later than May 1, 2018.  Publication releases will be required prior to payment of prize money.  Email entries to e-mail Kyle.shifflett@oscn.net.

Bar Preparation Scholarship Announcement (New Mexico)

To support and promote the practice of Indian Law in New Mexico and to help defray the costs of preparing for and taking the New Mexico bar examination, the Indian Law Section of the State Bar of New Mexico annually awards scholarships to third-year law students who intend to practice Indian Law in New Mexico. Students who will graduate in 2018 and take the bar examination within one year of graduation may apply. The 2018 Bar Scholarship will award up to a total of $4,000 or more in scholarships, which is subject to change based on the number of applicants, student interest and Indian Law Section resources. Applications must be postmarked no later than March 31, 2018.

NNABA Foundation Announces Bar Review Scholarships

Link: Foundation Scholarships

PHOENIX — The National Native American Bar Association (NNABA) Foundation is excited to announce its Bar Review Scholarship Program. NNABA Foundation will award at least ten (10) $1,500 scholarships. The NNABA Foundation is partnering with regional American Indian Bar Associations to award these Bar Review Scholarships.

More information and a copy of the NNABA Foundation Bar Review Scholarship application is available at the link above.

To advance its mission to foster the development of Native American lawyers, the NNABA Foundation Board of Directors established this Scholarship Program to help Native American law students offset bar review course/program expenses. “I am excited to announce the NNABA Foundation Bar Prep scholarship,” said Jennifer Weddle, NNABA president. “These scholarships help achieve the NNABA Foundation’s goal of supporting the full inclusion of Native American attorneys in the legal profession.” The Bar Review Scholarships were made possible by the generous support of Walmart and NBCUniversal.

The scholarship recipients will be honored at NNABA’s Annual Meeting, which will be held on April 5, 2017, at the Talking Stick Resort and Casino, Scottsdale, Arizona.

The deadline to apply for these scholarships is March 17, 2017.

Procopio Now Accepting Applications for 2016 Native American Law Internship

San Diego, CA – Procopio, San Diego’s largest business law firm, is excited to announce that it is now accepting applications for its 2016 Native American Law Internship.  Procopio maintains a long-standing tradition of providing growth opportunities to the communities it serves.  The Native American Practice Group extends this tradition by actively investing in the future leaders of Indian Country through paid internships for Native American law students or law students with an emphasis in Native American law.

Procopio’s Native American Law Interns have joined us from the Navajo Nation, Bishop Paiute Tribe, Iipay Nation of Santa Ysabel, Pala Band of Mission Indians, the Seminole Nation, the Cherokee Nation, the Shinnecock Indian Nation, the Isleta Pueblo and Tohono O’odham Nation.

This unique internship program provides an opportunity for law students to gain experience handling everyday legal issues facing Native American communities.  Interns are involved in matters that deal with specific Indian law-related legal practice matters and other legal problems facing tribal governments and Native entities.  Procopio enhances this educational experience even further with a community outreach component, in which interns provide guidance and inspiration regarding educational direction and opportunities to local Native American youth.

This paid Native American Law Internship program extends 8 to 10 weeks, and applicants should have completed their first year of law school prior to the start of the internship.

Applications are due by Friday, October 30th by 5 p.m. PST. 

Applications should include:

  • A blog post writing sample (for examples, see Blogging Circle)
  • Law school transcript
  • Resume
  • Cover letter identifying why this is an opportunity you would like to pursue, any tribal governmental experience you have and why Native legal issues are significant to you.

The writing sample for the internship program should be a 250-300 word sample blog post on a newsworthy Native legal topic of your choosing written in a way that will appeal to readers.

Applications can be submitted via email to ted.griswold@procopio.com or sent via USPS mail to:

Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch LLP
ATTN Ted Griswold
525 B St Ste 2200
San Diego CA 92101 4474

About Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch LLP

With more than 140 attorneys in San Diego, Del Mar, Silicon Valley, Austin and Phoenix, Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch LLP is one of the largest business law firms in Southern California. We are a regional law firm with an international network that gives us the ability to serve clients’ interests throughout the world. Procopio is dedicated to understanding the businesses and industries of clients and collaborating with them to develop tailored strategies. We advise companies at every stage in the corporate life cycle, helping them to plan, finance and operate their businesses. Our success has been derived from our commitment to clients and our ability to maximize the value we provide to them. Our goal is to continue building long-term relationships with clients through a steady, team-oriented approach. For additional information, please visit www.procopio.com.

Calif. Bar Exam Results and Affirmative Action Critics

From Cheryl Harris at UCLA Law:

Colleagues,

I am writing seeking your help and counsel in preventing the disclosure of private data regarding our students that would have little research value but could produce significant harm. Rick Sander, in collaboration with two other law professors, Bill Henderson of Indiana University School of Law and Vik Amar of UC Davis, is seeking to get the California Bar Examiners to release the bar exam scores, as distinct from the the passage rates, for Black and Latino law school graduates. He wants the LSAT scores, race, gender, law school attended, repeater status, and bar exam scores for all those taking the bar exam for the first time between 1997 and 2003—the classes admitted from 1994 to 1999. He furthers wants similar data on Black and Latino graduates from the classes of 2004 and 2005. His argument is that this will help evaluate his prior claims attributing poorer bar passage rates and lower law school performance to affirmative action ( or as he prefers to call it “racial preferences” ) which admit Black and Latino students with lower entering academic credentials into institutions with significantly higher median scores.

I am attaching a National Law Journal op-ed authored by myself and Walter Allen, Professor of Education and Sociology at UCLA, explaining why the Bar Examiners should stick by their original decision to deny him access to this material. The reason they point to is that the test takers provide the background information to the bar examiners for the purpose of determining testing validity—that is whether the test is fair. There is no specific request or consent given to provide access to a group of researchers to test a hypothesis. (I should point out that this disclosure is different from that g iven to LSAC projects like the BPS study or the more recent, After the JD study, in that institutional actors like LSAC who are governing bodies for the administration of evaluations have a distinct responsibility to engage in ongoing evaluation to determine best practices—a different inquiry than verifying a hypothesis.)This privacy concern is compounded by the fact that while his team promises to take precautions in structuring how the data will be reported, given the extremely small numbers of Black students in some of the cohorts, it would be possible for someone to extrapolate from the reported data back to a particular set of people.

There are serious problems with the research model that Sander et. al. propose. While this time the research team includes people who, unlike Sander, are not committed to the mismatch thesis, the reason that the research has twice failed to get National Science Foundation funding is that as the peer review letters disclose (all of this is on Sander’s website), the project is grounded on a set of assumptions—among them that bar scores reflect what is learned in law school—and encumbered by a set of problems that skew the pool to be tested—so-called selection biases.

Rather than addressing these issues, and figure out how to redesign the proposal so that it will meet peer review, Sander has now engaged in a campaign to publicly pressure the California Bar into giving him this data. He first went to the US Civil Rights Commission which is now populated by people like Abigail Thernstrom and Gail Heriot, of the Proposition 209 campaign, who unsurprisingly support his request since his research supports their political opposition to affirmative action. Heriot wrote an article in the Wall Street Journal chastising the committee for giving into political correctness and then Sander and Amar wrote the LA Times op-ed Sept 26 to which Walter and I responded.

Sander has succe eded in getting the Board of Governors of the California Bar to review the initial decision to deny and set the matter for a public hearing on November 8, 2007 before the Board’s Committee on Regulation, Admissions and Discipline Oversight at 2:30 here in Los Angeles. Thus far, there are letters on record supporting the general idea of Sander’s project and urging the release of this data. If the board is to be fully apprised of the issues and take account of the concerns regarding potential harm, it needs to hear from as many as possible. I know that colleagues at Stanford are planning to appear and that students and alum from Stanford are wanting to be heard as well. I will be there also.

I am writing to ask if you would be willing to weigh in. Regardless of whether one thinks that the mismatch hypothesis has been empirically demonstrated or not, the problem here is that the method proposed to test it is deeply flawed and risks putting our students in harm’s wa y, without their even having given consent to such examination.

If you think you might be interested, I would ask that you contact me via email and then perhaps an appropriate response can be coordinated. Excuse the length of the email but I wanted to be as thorough as possible.

The op-ed is here.

Thanks,

Cheryl

Boozhoo!

Welcome to the blog of the Michigan State University College of Law’s Indigenous Law and Policy Center!!!!

You can learn more about the Center by visiting our website.

We are hosting the 4th annual Indigenous Law Conference on October 19-20, 2007. You can register here.

We also publish occasional papers and white papers regarding Indian law and policy areas at this site. We have researched and written (often with our students) papers on tribal law, the Michigan ban on affirmative action, and other topics.