Tribes Prevail in Standing Rock Suit, Court Orders Army Corps Prepare EIS on Dakota Access Pipeline

Here is the order in Standing Rock Sioux Tribe v. United States Army Corps of Engineers (D.D.C.):

2020-03-25-dkt-496-memorandum-opinion-re-495-order-on-motions-for-summary-judgment.-signed-by-judge-james-e.-boasberg-on-3252020.pdf

More details later.

Danielle Delaney on Environmental Law, Indigenous Identity, and #NoDAPL

Danielle Delaney has published “Under Coyote’s Mask: Environmental Law, Indigenous Identity, and #NoDAPL” in the Michigan Journal of Race & Law.

The abstract:

This Article studies the relationship between the three main lawsuits filed by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, and the Yankton Sioux Tribe against the Dakota Access Pipeline (DaPL) and the mass protests launched from the Sacred Stone and Oceti Sakowin protest camps. The use of environmental law as the primary legal mechanism to challenge the construction of the pipeline distorted the indigenous demand for justice as U.S. federal law is incapable of seeing the full depth of the indigenous worldview supporting their challenge. Indigenous activists constantly re-centered the direct actions and protests within indigenous culture to remind non-indigenous activists and the wider media audience that the protests were an indigenous protest, rather than a purely environmental protest, a distinction that was obscured as the litigation progressed. The NoDAPL protests, the litigation to prevent the completion and later operation of the pipeline, and the social movement that the protests engendered, were an explosive expression of indigenous resistance—resistance to systems that silence and ignore indigenous voices while attempting to extract resources from their lands and communities. As a case study, the protests demonstrate how the use of litigation, while often critical to achieving the goals of political protest, distorts the expression of politics not already recognized within the legal discourse.

Tribal Motions for Summary Judgment in Standing Rock v. Army Corps [Dakota Access Pipeline]

Here are the new materials in Standing Rock Sioux Tribe v. United States Army Corps of Engineers (D.D.C.):

418 DCT Order on Administrative Record

433-2 Standing Rock Motion for Summary Judgment

434-2 Oglala Motion for Summary Judgment

435-1 Yankton Motion for Summary Judgment

436-1 Cheyenne River Motion for Summary Judgment

439 NCAI Amicus Brief

Federal Court Orders Partial Supplementation to Dakota Access Pipeline Administrative Record

Here is the order in Standing Rock Sioux Tribe v. United States Army Corps of Engineers (D.D.C.):

SRST v USACOE

Reviews of Nick Estes’ “Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance”

NPR

The Intercept

HNN

The book webpage from Verso is here.

Federal Court Dismisses Dakota Access Pipeline-Related RICO Suit Brought by Pipeline Co. against Greenpeace and Individual Indians

Here are the materials in Energy Transfer Equity LP v. Greenpeace International (D.N.D.):

95 Amended Complaint

102 Greenpeace Fund MTD

103-1 Greenpeace Intl MTD

111 Response

121 Two Bulls MTD

125 Response

126 Two Bulls Reply

130 Montoya MTD

131 Response

135 DCT Order

Iowa Law Review Student Scholarship on How NHPA Fails Tribal Interests

Amanda M. Marincic has published “The National Historic Preservation Act: An Inadequate Attempt to Protect the Cultural and Religious Sites of Native Nations” in the Iowa Law Review.

An excerpt:

Beginning in 2016, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe engaged in a highly-publicized, year-long legal battle with Energy Transfer Partners regarding the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (“DAPL”). The Tribe initially argued that the DAPL’s construction would destroy ancient burial sites and potentially poison their only source of drinking water, the Missouri River. The Tribe also argued that the agency involved in the project, the Army Corps of Engineers, did not fulfill the obligations required by the NHPA. For a while, the fate of the DAPL was uncertain, with permits for construction being denied and then granted. After the Army Corps of Engineers granted the permit pursuant to President Trump’s memorandum, construction on the DAPL was completed. After several failed attempts by the Standing Rock Sioux to halt operation of the DAPL, a federal district judge ruled in June 2017 that the environmental impact studies done on the DAPL were inadequate. While this ruling is a small victory for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, the NHPA was useless in protecting its cultural sites from significant damage.